Colloquia and Seminars

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Computer Science events calendar in HTTP ICS format for of Google calendars, and for Outlook.

Academic Calendar at Technion site.

Upcoming Colloquia & Seminars

  • Coding Theory: Private Information Retrieval in Distributed Storage Systems

    Speaker:
    Yiwei Zhang (CS, Technion)
    Date:
    Sunday, 21.1.2018, 14:30
    Place:
    Taub 601

    A private information retrieval (PIR) protocol allows a user to retrieve a data item from a database without revealing any information about the identity of the data item to a certain coalition of servers. In this talk, we will go over the recent results on PIR, especially on PIR in MDS-coded databases with colluding servers. We will also mention various other PIR models including PIR with robust/Byzantine servers or PIR with arbitrary collusion patterns.

  • On the Expressive Power of ConvNets and RNNs as a Function of their Architecture

    Speaker:
    Amnon Shashua - COLLOQUIUM LECTURE -
    Date:
    Tuesday, 23.1.2018, 10:30
    Place:
    Auditorium 2 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Hebrew University; CEO & CTO, Mobileye; Senior Vice President, Intel Corporation
    Host:
    Ron Kimmel

    Expressive efficiency refers to the relation between two architectures A and B, whereby any function realized by B could be replicated by A, but there exists functions realized by A, which cannot be replicated by B unless its size grows significantly larger. For example, it is known that deep networks are exponentially efficient with respect to shallow networks, in the sense that a shallow network must grow exponentially large in order to approximate the functions represented by a deep network of polynomial size. In this work, we extend the study of expressive efficiency to the attribute of network connectivity and in particular to the effect of "overlaps" in the convolutional process, i.e., when the stride of the convolution is smaller than its filter size (receptive field). Our analysis shows that having overlapping local receptive fields, and more broadly denser connectivity, results in an exponential increase in the expressive capacity of neural networks. Moreover, while denser connectivity can increase the expressive capacity, we show that the most common types of modern architectures already exhibit exponential increase in expressivity, without relying on fully-connected layers. Joint work with Or Sharir Short Bio: ========== Amnon Shashua holds the Sachs chair in computer science at the Hebrew University. He received his Ph.D. degree in 1993 from the AI lab at MIT working on computational vision where he pioneered work on multiple view geometry and the recognition of objects under variable lighting. His work on multiple view geometry received best paper awards at the ECCV 2000, the Marr prize in ICCV 2001 and the Landau award in exact sciences in 2005. His work on Graphical Models received a best paper award at the UAI 2008. Prof. Shashua was the head of the School of Engineering and Computer Science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem during the term 2003-2005. He is also well known on founding startup companies in computer vision and his latest brainchild Mobileye employs today 250 people developing systems-on-chip and computer vision algorithms for detecting pedestrians, vehicles, and traffic signs for driving assistance systems. For his industrial contributions prof. Shashua received the 2004 Kaye Innovation award from the Hebrew University. ============================= Refreshments will be served from 10:15 Lecture starts at 10:30

  • Project Fair in IoT and Android

    Project Fair in IoT and Android

    Date:
    Tuesday, 23.1.2018, 12:30
    Place:
    CS Taub Lobby

    On Tuesday, January 23, 2018, between 12:30-14:30, at the CS Taub Loby, the Systems and Software Development Laboratory (SSDL) will hold a project Fair on IoT and Android, presenting the newest and most inspiring projects presented by the developing teams.

    You are all invited!

    Details on the presenting projects in the Hebrew page.

  • ceClub: Recent Developments in Linkography Based Cyber Security

    Speaker:
    Robert Mitchell (Sandia National Laboratories)
    Date:
    Wednesday, 24.1.2018, 11:30
    Place:
    Taub 301

    Cyber attacks on critical cyber systems are not decreasing in frequency or complexity. Aggressors choose the time and place of these engagements; protectors must identify, research and develop defensive techniques that provide an asymmetric advantage. A static, data-driven, preventative, automated defense is a losing strategy; an effective defense must be dynamic, behavioral, responsive and capitalize on a human in the loop. We propose human and machine performed linkography to detect, correlate, attribute and predict attacker behavior and present a moving, deceptive target. Recently, our team generated a technology transfer strategy for linkography based cyber security, proposed algorithms to extract and refine linkograph ontologies and subsessionize our input stream and completed our previous related machine learning work. Linkography has been in the literature for decades, and our investigation indicates it is an open, fertile topic for basic and applied cyber security research.

    Bio:
    Dr. Robert Mitchell is currently a member of technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories. He received the Ph.D, M.S. and B.S. from Virginia Tech. Robert served as a military officer for six years and has over 12 years of industry experience, having worked previously at Boeing, BAE Systems, Raytheon and Nokia. His research interests include game theory, linkography, moving target defense, computer network operations, network security, intrusion detection and cyber physical systems. Robert has published 23 peer reviewed articles.

  • On The Existence of q-Fano Planes

    Speaker:
    Niv Hooker, M.Sc. Thesis Seminar
    Date:
    Wednesday, 24.1.2018, 16:30
    Place:
    Taub 601
    Advisor:
    Prof. T. Etzion

    A q-Steiner System S_q(t,k,n) is set S of k-subspaces in a space of dimension n over a finite field, such that each t-subspace of the same space is contained in exactly one subspace from S. They have applications in random network Coding, but except for one set of parameters for which t>1, their existence is unknown. Specifically, the q-Fano plane S_q(2,3,7) is the smallest structure for which its existence is unknown. In the seminar I will show construction of a structure that might be a step forward in the way to a construction of a q-Fano Plane.

  • Exposure Evening to Communication Networks

    Exposure Evening to Communication Networks

    Date:
    Wednesday, 24.1.2018, 18:30
    Place:
    Taub 401

    The CS Computer Communication Lab (LCCN) invites you to an exposure evening to communication networks - to get to know the laboratory activity, the research and the projects it offers and the team that leads them:
    Prof. Danny Raz - Laboratory Head
    Itzik Ashkenazi - Lab Engineer
    and special guest, Daniel Bar-Lev - Director, MEF CTO.

    The event will take place on Wednesday, at 18:30, at room 401 (4th floor).

    Students to all degrees that find interest in the field are most welcome.

  • Inferring Cancer Dependencies on Metabolic Genes from Large-Scale Genetic Screens

    Speaker:
    Shoval Lagziel, M.Sc. Thesis Seminar
    Date:
    Thursday, 25.1.2018, 12:30
    Place:
    Taub 601
    Advisor:
    Prof. Tomer Shlomi

    Alterations in metabolic activity in tumors provide novel means to selectively target cancer cells. A powerful tool for identifying genes essential for cancer cell proliferation and survival is genome-scale RNAi and CRISPR-based genetic silencing screens. Integration of the measured gene essentiality datasets with genomic characterization of genes was shown to provide mechanistic understanding of tumor-specific gene essentiality. Here, we analyze the essentiality of metabolic enzyme-coding genes in cancer by utilizing measurements from recent large-scale genetic screens, identifying a confounding effect of the tissue culture media on gene essentiality - which, quite surprisingly, was previously not accounted for. We find that gene expression may be helpful to predict essentiality in some cases while in most situations a more complex predictive model is required to infer the essentiality of a given gene. Computationally controlling for the effect of culture media, we characterize cancer dependence on metabolic enzyme-coding genes. We show that controlling for the effect of the culture media is fundamental for the identification of molecular signatures explaining cancer dependency on metabolic genes.

  • CGGC Seminar: Algorithms for Geometrically-Structured Optimization

    Speaker:
    Justin Solomon (MIT)
    Date:
    Sunday, 28.1.2018, 13:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.

    Many problems in geometry processing, graph theory, and machine learning involve optimizations whose variables are defined over a geometric domain. The geometry of the domain gives rise to geometric structure in the optimization problem itself. In this talk, I will show how leveraging geometric structure in the optimization problem gives rise to efficient and stable algorithms applicable to a variety of application domains. In particular, I will describe new methods for problems arising in shape analysis/correspondence, flows on graphs, and surface parameterization. Bio: Justin Solomon is an assistant professor in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He leads the new Geometric Data Processing Group studying geometric problems in computer graphics, computer vision and machine learning.

  • Celebrating 40th Anniversary of the Lempel-Ziv Algorithm

    Celebrating 40th Anniversary of the Lempel-Ziv Algorithm

    Date:
    Monday, 5.2.2018, 14:00
    Place:
    EE Meyer Building 1003

    You are invited to a special lecture and ceremony celebrating 40th Anniversary of the Lempel-Ziv Algorithm, by Prof. Meir Feder from the School of Electrical Engineering in Tel-Aviv University on: "Beyond Compression: Lempel-Ziv in Learning and Prediction".

    The event will take place on Monday, February 5th, 2018, at 14:00, in the Auditorium 1003, EE Meyer Building, Technion.

    Program:
    14:00 - Refreshments
    14:30 - Celebration
    15:00 - Lecture

    You are all invited.

  • Efficiently combining privacy and availability in distributed storage systems

    Speaker:
    Roman Shor, M.Sc. Thesis Seminar
    Date:
    Wednesday, 7.2.2018, 10:30
    Place:
    Taub 601
    Advisor:
    Dr. G. Yadgar, Prof. E. Yaakobi and Prof. Assaf Shuster

    When sensitive data is stored in the cloud, the only way to ensure its secrecy is by encrypting it before it is uploaded. Not only is encryption itself computationally expensive but the encryption keys must also be safely stored and the data decrypted whenever it is downloaded. The emerging multi-cloud model, in which data is stored redundantly in two or more independent clouds, provides an opportunity to protect sensitive data with secret-sharing schemes. This approach trades complexity and key management for storage overhead. However, with the introduction of hardware accelerated encryption mechanisms, the benefit of this tradeoff is not clear. In this work, we establish the applicability of secure RAID, a recently proposed construction that minimizes the storage and computation overheads of secret sharing to multi-cloud environments. To that end, we present the first end-to-end comparison of state-of-the-art encryption-based and secret-sharing data protection approaches. Our evaluation on a local cluster and on a multi-cloud prototype identifies the tipping point at which the bottleneck of data protection shifts from the computational overhead of encoding and random data generation to storage and network bandwidth and global availability.

  • Network Measurement meets Virtual Switching

    Speaker:
    Ran Ben-Basat, Ph.D. Thesis Seminar
    Date:
    Wednesday, 14.2.2018, 14:30
    Place:
    Taub 601
    Advisor:
    Prof. Roy Friedman

    In modern cloud infrastructures, each physical server often runs multiple virtual machines and employs a software Virtual Switch (VS) to handle their traffic. In addition to switching, the VS performs network measurements, such as identifying the most frequent flows, which are essential for networking applications such as load balancing and intrusion detection. Unlike traditional streaming algorithms, which minimize the space requirements, the bottleneck in virtual switching measurement is the CPU utilization. In this talk, I will present new hardware-oriented algorithms and acceleration methods that optimize the update time for software, at the cost of a slight memory overhead.